IAIA Together Apart

Keeping the IAIA community connected

#IAIATogetherApart on Instagram

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The pandemic has brought me much sadness, but also blessings. A couple months ago, my family had lost my aunt to Covid-19. When I first heard the news, I cried so many tears for my aunt. I always hoped she was doing well. It had been many years since I've last seen her. The memories of what she looked like, her voice, and smile echoed in my mind and crumbled my heart. I still really miss her as I am writing this. I deeply wish I can see her and hug her. Just seeing my family has brought me so much comfort, and so is living with my boyfriend. Family has never mattered so much more to me during times like this. All I can believe right now is everything will be okay. #iaiatogetherapart ...

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The following letter is a submission from⁣ #IAIATogetherApart, set 50 years from now. To see more submissions or submit your own, visit togetherapart.iaia.edu.⁣

Pandemic Letter—April 9, 2020, 1:42 pm, Anonymous⁣

Dear Reader,⁣

I am writing from a world in which there is no shortage of grotesque heaps of hurt. Assuming that hasn’t gone away, maybe you’re sick of being pat on the head. Maybe you’re sick of being at the receiving end of that hurt. Maybe you’re sick of having to explain why it hurts, or maybe you’re just sick. I take it you’ve heard of COVID-19. Perhaps you’ve been a witness to your grandparent or great-grandparent ranting and reeling about the effect it had on their lives, or maybe told the same stories by your parents. They were stories about how hard they had to work to keep their jobs, or how hard they had to work to educate their children by themselves with countless additional responsibilities. Maybe your elders would say things about how they needed to feel privileged that they had a job at all—from home or at risk. They needed to be grateful that they were slaves to capitalism at the desires of the rich. Maybe your grandparents were children when coronavirus initially began. Maybe your grandparents couldn’t graduate college or high school that initial year. They remember watching their parents struggle to provide, struggle to ration food, some not knowing where their money was coming from after being “guaranteed” their position, but laid off nonetheless. The other side of the coin could be stories of how they remember their parents going out, living as-is, shopping constantly, not wearing masks, or gloves, or caring. Maybe they remember losing someone—a parent, a friend, a child? Maybe they were isolated alone, or without resources. You didn’t live through it, but this is not the depression, 9/11, or the recession of yore. This is different. So much about this disease was unforeseen. It was merciless, fast, suffocating, and unpredictable.⁣

(Continued in the comments)
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#FlashbackFriday to the 2018 Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) Holiday Art Market. IAIA holds this art market annually during the holiday season, offering a wide variety of unique handmade items made by the talented members of the IAIA community. This year however, due to COVID-19 restrictions, the 2020 IAIA Holiday Art Market will be going virtual on Monday, November 16, 2020. Despite the unconventional nature of this year’s market, it is our hope that we are able to highlight a more extensive selection of artists from our community, and ensure that there truly is something for everyone.⁣

The registration for vendors is currently open and free of charge. All that participants need to sign up is an email, up-to-date contact information, a functioning e-commerce site, and to be an IAIA community member which includes students, alumni, faculty, and staff members. To register as a vendor, visit www.iaia.edu/2020artmarketsignup.⁣

For those who do not have a website and would like to build one to participate in the market, the Office of Institutional Advancement (OIA) will be offering classes through Continuing Education (CE) to help participants learn how to build and maintain their own e-commerce site. To sign up for these classes, visit www.iaia.edu/outreach/continuing-education (link in bio) or email IAIA Alumni Relations Officer Roanna Shebala (Diné/Zuni) at alumni@iaia.edu of you have any questions.⁣

Photograph by Jason S. Ordaz, Institute of American Indian Arts
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Alumni Spotlight—David Bradley (Chippewa) ’79⁣

Artist and IAIA Alumnus David Bradley is known for his artwork that often conveys a political message concerning Native Americans. He has played a significant role not only in the advancement of Native American art, but also in the struggle for Native American rights. As a young man, Bradley joined the Peace Corps, living in Guatemala where he learned a new life outlook—“an experience with essentials”—that allowed him to better understand his heritage and “changed him forever.” After returning from the Peace Corps, he was drawn to the Southwest and attended IAIA, where he graduated first in his class with an AFA in sculpture, and then received his BA in Fine Arts from the College of Santa Fe in 1980. He also studied at the University of Arizona, and was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Humanities from IAIA in 2016.⁣

Bradley has called his life and his art a symbolic vision quest. His work often expresses his philosophical and political ideas. As a member of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Bradley strongly believes that Natives need to reclaim their own identity and work politically to assure they will survive as a distinct culture.⁣

Bradley has received numerous awards and fellowships, including recognition as the first artist to win the top awards in both the Fine Art categories of painting and sculpture at the Santa Fe Indian Market. Bradley has exhibited his work throughout the nation at some of the preeminent museums in the country.⁣

Photograph by Jason S. Ordaz, Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA)
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This week is #NationalCollegiateAlcoholAwarenessWeek, which aims to bring attention to issues posed by excessive drinking among college students. It’s no secret that partying and excessive drinking are often thought of as a part of college culture—and this year, with the added stresses that have come with COVID-19, we understand that the motivation to drink can be overwhelming. The Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) wants to aid our students in making healthy choices, and provides multiple programs campus-wide to support the health and well being of our students. We encourage all students to utilize these services as needed.⁣

One such department is the Prevention Program. Our campus prevention program is here to support our Tribal Arts College with a wide array of alcohol and substance use prevention activities, suicide prevention training, health education, and community resources to ensure the safety, success, and well being of our college community.⁣
Programs are designed to promote realistic estimates of your peers’ and your own substance use, to increase your success and health, to reduce your risk, and to help achieve a thriving campus community free from the negative consequences of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs (ATOD). To learn more about the IAIA Prevention Program, visit www.iaia.edu/student-life/prevention/, or follow them at IAIA_Prevention.⁣

Likewise, the IAIA Counseling Program is available to enrolled students as a student support service, and immediate family members living on campus may also qualify for services. These services include individual trauma-informed therapy, expressive arts, art therapy, talk therapy, and body-centered modalities to address a wide array of concerns that are common to the college experience. The Counseling Program also hosts an expressive arts group, “Well Being Through Expressive Arts,” every Wednesday at 4 pm (MDT). This group is open to all students, faculty, and staff—the Zoom link to join is available via IAIA email. To learn more about counseling at IAIA, visit www.iaia.edu/student-life/counseling/.⁣

Photograph by Jason S. Ordaz, Institute of American Indian Arts
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In honor of #IndigenousPeoplesDay, the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) is featuring an alumni every day this week as part of our ongoing Alumni Spotlight Series. IAIA’s mission “to empower creativity and leadership in Native Arts and cultures through higher education, life-long learning, and outreach,” is more than a statement—it is the on-going objective of all that we do. These alumni embody our core values, and help to further our mission from an Indigenous perspective.⁣

Alumni Spotlight—Patricia Michaels (Taos Pueblo) ’89⁣

IAIA Alumna Patricia Michaels is an accomplished and respected haute couture fashion designer whose one-of-a-kind pieces transcend cultures and defy fashion trends. In 2012 she was featured on Bravo’s Emmy Award-winning “Project Runway” Season Eleven, where she won the first runner up title. Following her run on the show, she was asked back to be in “Project Runway Allstars” Season Four. Michaels was the first Native American contestant to compete on the show, and wanted to set an example and be a voice for Native American youth. She was also the first Native American to have a collection at the Lincoln Center during the Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week in New York City.⁣

Michaels has received several awards during the span of her career, including the “Arts and Design Award” from the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian Board of Directors, “2013 Taos Citizen of the Year Award,” “Letter of Recognition of Achievements” by the New Mexico State Senator's Office and Senator Tom Udall, as well as multiple awards from SWAIA Santa Fe Indian Market including “Best of Classification in Textiles,” first place in “Garments,” and first place in “Contemporary Fashion and Accessories” in 2011. She now runs her company, “PM Waterlily,” where she continues to design high-end and limited edition fashion using organic materials and hand-dying techniques while practicing cultural sustainability. She is based in Santa Fe, New Mexico.⁣

Photograph by Jason S. Ordaz, Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA)
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In honor of #IndigenousPeoplesDay, the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) is featuring an alumni every day this week as part of our ongoing Alumni Spotlight Series. IAIA’s mission “to empower creativity and leadership in Native Arts and cultures through higher education, life-long learning, and outreach,” is more than a statement—it is the on-going objective of all that we do. These alumni embody our core values, and help to further our mission from an Indigenous perspective.⁣

Alumni Spotlight—Santee Frazier (Cherokee Nation) ’06⁣

IAIA Low Residency MFA in Creative Writing Director and author Santee Frazier received his BFA from the Institute of American Indian Arts, and his MFA from Syracuse University. Frazier is the author of poetry collections “Aurum” (University of Arizona Press, 2019) and “Dark Thirty” (University of Arizona Press, 2009), and his poems have appeared in “Ontario Review,” “American Poet,” and “Prairie Schooner,” among others. He has received fellowships from the Lannan Foundation, the School for Advanced Research, and the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation.⁣

Photograph by Jason S. Ordaz, Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA)
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Effective tonight—Thursday, October 15, 2020 at 11:59 pm Hawaii Standard Time (HST)—the United States Census Bureau will halt the count for the 2020 United States Census. If you have not completed your census yet, don’t miss your opportunity to do so! Ten minutes right now will help sow the seeds for our future and determine where billions of dollars in federal funding will be distributed.⁣

The census is a simple count of everyone in the United States, regardless of age, immigration status, or any other factor, and a census under count means cuts for Title I schools and school food programs, cuts for firefighters and first responders, less funding for improving roads, and reduced access to health care for the next ten years. It also impacts our political representation. It is critical that all voices are heard.⁣

The census is important. Your responses are secure. Time is running out. Count everyone in your household today at www.2020census.gov.⁣

Photograph by Jason S. Ordaz, Institute of American Indian Arts
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In honor of #IndigenousPeoplesDay, the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) is featuring an alumni every day this week as part of our ongoing Alumni Spotlight Series. IAIA’s mission “to empower creativity and leadership in Native Arts and cultures through higher education, life-long learning, and outreach,” is more than a statement—it is the on-going objective of all that we do. These alumni embody our core values, and help to further our mission from an Indigenous perspective.⁣

Alumni Spotlight—Charlene Teters (Spokane) ’86⁣

IAIA alumna, former Academic Dean, award-winning artist, educator, and activist Charlene Teters earned an AFA from IAIA, a BFA from the College of Santa Fe, and an MFA from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. In addition, she was awarded an honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts from Mitchell College in New London, CT.⁣

She first gained national prominence as a graduate student at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign where she led protests against the degrading depictions of Native Americans, which has led to a strong upswing in efforts to eliminate these mascots in the United States. This history of her activism is the subject of a nationally-aired award-winning documentary “In Whose Honor?” by Jay Rosenstein. She was one of the driving forces behind the recent decision to rename the Washington Football Team.⁣

As an artist, Teters has a history of producing politically-impactful installations. During the 1999 SiteSantaFe Biennial “Looking for a Place,” artists were invited to participate with works focusing on place. Teters had observed that the Obelisk at the Santa Fe Plaza, which was partially inscribed with the term “savage Indians,” had been modified when someone chiseled away the word “savage.” Teters created her own obelisk which only contained the word “savage,” and placed it near the plaza. Her perspective on this installation is that it was not created to be confrontational—merely to spur discussion on the topic.⁣

Photograph by Jason S. Ordaz, Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA)
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The twelfth annual SantaFeIndieFilmFest (SFiFF) begins today and the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) is pleased to present the Indigenous Film Program. Running October 14-18, 2020, this year the film festival will take place at Motorama.SantaFe drive-in theater as well as virtually through the Virtual Film Festival.⁣

The 2020 Indigenous Film Program includes the following selections:⁣
• Indigenous Narrative Features—“Monkey Beach” directed by Loretta Todd, “Rustic Oracle” directed by Sonia Bonspille Boileau, “Juliana and the Medicine Fish” directed by Jeremy Torrie⁣
• Indigenous Documentary Features—“My Dear Mother” directed by Paul-Anders Simma, “My Blood Is Red” directed by Various, “We Are Unarmed” directed by Gwendolen Cates⁣
• SFiFF Indigenous Short Film Program—“Blackwater” directed by Boise Esquerra, “Border Nation” directed by Jason Jaacks, “Future Ancestor” directed by Josue Rivas, “Invasion: The Unist'ot'en's Fight for Sovereignty” directed by Michael Toledano and Sam Vinal, “Now Is The Time” directed by Christopher Auchter, “Nuxalk Radio” directed by Banchi Hanuse, “Tarcila: Indigenous Solutions to Climate Change from Peru” directed by Sarah Kuck, “Without A Whisper—Konnón kwe” directed by Katsitsionni Fox⁣
• New Mexico Features: Indigenous Films—“Seekers” directed by Aurore Vullierme, “FUKRY” directed by Blackhorse Lowe⁣
• New Mexico Shorts: Indigenous Films—New Mexico Narrative Short Program (“4 Years to Infinite” directed by Jordana Bass, “Part of a Balanced Breakfast” directed by Jordan Rae Herron, “They Return” directed by Lonnie R Begaye), New Mexico Documentary Short Program (“Lloyd ‘Kiva’ New: An American Entrepreneur” directed by Nathaniel Fuentes)⁣
• 2020 IAIA Student Short Program—“Sister” directed by Jedadiah Richards, “Tomena” directed by Gary Medina Cook, “Sage Me Not” directed by Erik Sanchez, “The Show” directed by Leroy Grafe, “Broduce” directed by Carrie Dada⁣

For more information and to purchase tickets visit www.santafeindependentfilmfestival.com.⁣

Photograph from “Invasion: The Unist'ot'en's Fight for Sovereignty” directed by Michael Toledano and Sam Vinal
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In honor of #IndigenousPeoplesDay, the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) is featuring an alumni every day this week as part of our ongoing Alumni Spotlight Series. IAIA’s mission “to empower creativity and leadership in Native Arts and cultures through higher education, life-long learning, and outreach,” is more than a statement—it is the on-going objective of all that we do. These alumni embody our core values, and help to further our mission from an Indigenous perspective.⁣

Alumni Spotlight—Tommy Orange (Cheyenne/Arapaho) ’17⁣

Author and IAIA Alumnus Tommy Orange was born and raised in Oakland, California and is a graduate of the IAIA Creative Writing MFA program, as well as an MFA Mentor. A 2014 MacDowell Fellow and a 2016 Writing by Writers Fellow, his first novel, “There There” (Alfred A. Knopf 2018) is a national bestseller. It received the 2019 PEN/Hemingway Award for Distinguished New Novel, the National Book Critics Circle John Leonard Prize, the Center for Fiction First Novel Prize, and the American Book Award. In addition, “There There” was shortlisted for the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction and the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, was a Pulitzer Prize finalist, and was also recognized as one of the Ten Best Books of 2018 by The New York Times, as well as various other publications.⁣

Photograph by Jason S. Ordaz, Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA)
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Dear IAIA Community,⁣

Fourteen states, including New Mexico, and numerous municipalities across the country are celebrating and honoring Indigenous histories and cultures as well acknowledging our contributions to this land. We are blessed at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) because every day is #IndigenousPeoplesDay—our mission, programs, and coursework reflect Indigenous cultures, histories, and traditions, which are woven into the fabric of our community existence.⁣

We also rejoice in the resilience, perseverance, and strength of our ancestors in surviving the effects of colonization. I am confident this will continue to hold true for the current challenges posed by the virus pandemic that has killed and hospitalized Indigenous people at higher rates than other groups, and magnified disparities in healthcare, economic well-being, and education. Your commitment to IAIA and Indigenous higher education will make a positive difference for you and all of us.⁣

Thank you and Happy Indigenous People’s Day,⁣
Dr. Robert Martin (Cherokee Nation), IAIA President⁣

Photograph by Jason S. Ordaz, Institute of American Indian Arts
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This #IndigenousPeoplesDay the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) celebrates our Indigenous students, alumni, faculty, staff, and community members, as well as all of our Indigenous relatives around the world. We are #ManyNationsOneFamily. As such, today we kick off our Alumni Spotlight Series. IAIA’s mission “to empower creativity and leadership in Native Arts and cultures through higher education, life-long learning, and outreach,” is more than a statement—it is the on-going objective of all that we do. These alumni embody our core values, and help to further our mission from an Indigenous perspective.⁣

Alumni Spotlight—Joy Harjo (Mvskoke Nation) ’68⁣

Alumna, author, musician, and twenty-third Poet Lau­re­ate of the Unit­ed States—and currently serving a second term—Joy Har­jo, attended high school at IAIA. Har­jo began writ­ing poet­ry as a mem­ber of the Uni­ver­si­ty of New Mexico's Native stu­dent orga­ni­za­tion, the Kiva Club, in response to Native empow­er­ment move­ments. She went on to earn her MFA at the Iowa Writ­ers' Work­shop and teach Eng­lish, Cre­ative Writ­ing, and Amer­ican Indi­an Stud­ies at various institutions across the country, and was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Humanities during IAIA’s 2020 commencement ceremony.⁣

Har­jo is the author of nine books of poet­ry, a mem­oir, two children's books, an anthol­o­gy of North Amer­i­can Native women's writ­ing, sev­er­al screen­plays and col­lec­tions of prose inter­views, and three plays which she toured as a one-woman show. She also per­forms on sax­o­phone and flutes—solo and with her band—and has toured across the U.S. and in Europe, South Amer­i­ca, India, Africa, and Cana­da. Har­jo has pro­duced five award-win­ning music albums.⁣

In addi­tion to being an award winning U.S. Poet Laureate, Har­jo is a chan­cel­lor of the Acad­e­my of Amer­i­can Poets, holds a Tul­sa Artist Fel­low­ship, directs For Girls Becom­ing, an arts men­tor­ship pro­gram for young Mvskoke women, and is a found­ing board mem­ber of the Native Arts and Cul­tures Foun­da­tion. She lives in Tul­sa, Oklahoma.⁣

Photograph by Jason S. Ordaz, Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA)
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The Santa Fe Independent Film Festival (SFiFF) has announced its highly anticipated Indigenous Film Program presented by the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA). The program includes six feature films, eight Indigenous shorts, six additional films from the New Mexico Film program, as well as the IAIA Student Shorts Program.⁣

“It’s taken several years for this program to grow to this stature, I’m really pleased with the number of Indigenous films and quality selections we have for the program this year.”—SFiFF Advisory Chair Gary Farmer (Haudenosaunee/Iroquois)⁣

Now coming up on the twelfth annual Santa Fe Independent Film Festival October 14-18, 2020, santafeindiefilmfest began in 2009 as a fringe festival that took place in a community center. By 2011, it was the largest event of its kind in New Mexico—screening over 100 films during a five-day fest. SFiFF has grown from humble beginnings to becoming one of the top annual events in New Mexico and has effectively helped extend Santa Fe’s tourism season into late October. Due to COVID-19, this year the film festival will take place at the motorama.santafe drive-in theater in Santa Fe, New Mexico with anticipated documentary premieres and narrative features. Festival goers will also be able to enjoy SFiFF from the comfort of their own homes with the Virtual Film Festival including over 30 feature films, 75 short films, and panels.⁣

For more information and to purchase festival passes, visit www.santafeindependentfilmfestival.com/. ⁣

Photograph from “Monkey Beach” directed by Loretta Todd
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Students, do you need a moment to relax and unwind during midterm week? The Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) Counseling Team invites you to their weekly “Well-Being Through Expressive Arts” group, every Wednesday at 4 pm (MDT) via Zoom. This is a great opportunity to connect with the Counseling Team and IAIA community while engaging in some relaxing and fun expressive arts activities. This group is open to all students, faculty, and staff—the Zoom link to join is available via IAIA email.⁣

Mila Anguluan, PhD (Filipino American), Eliza Combs, MA, LPCC, ATR, and Madge Duus, MA, LMHC (Navajo/Danish) are available to answer any questions at mila.anguluan@iaia.edu, eliza.combs@iaia.edu, and mduus@iaia.edu.⁣

IAIA Counseling is available to enrolled students as a student support service, and immediate family members living on campus may also qualify. The counseling program encourages all students to utilize these services, when needed, as additional support during the time they are enrolled in school. Many students benefit from utilizing this opportunity to address questions and concerns about campus life and to deepen their understanding of themselves in a respectful, confidential, and supportive environment. To learn more about counseling services at IAIA, visit www.iaia.edu/student-life/counseling/.⁣

Photograph by Jason S. Ordaz, Institute of American Indian Arts
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Today, Tuesday, October 6, 2020 is the last day to register to vote in New Mexico for the General Election and early voting begins as well—if you are not yet registered, don’t miss your opportunity, visit www.vote.org (link in bio) to register now.⁣

If you plan to vote early, do not forget the New Mexico Go Bond C. This will provide funding to New Mexico’s colleges, universities, and specialty schools ensuring students have the resources they need to get an education and succeed. It is also a good way to help revitalize our state’s economy. NM Go Bond C will include $700,000 for the development of the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) Research Center for Contemporary Native Arts (RCCNA), with the mission of “Uniting Art, Artists, and Archives”—as well as funding to other institutions such as the New Mexico School for the Deaf (NMSD), Santa Fe Community College (SFCC), and Santa Fe Indian School (SFIS).⁣

The IAIA RCCNA will support the education of current students in the Studio Arts, Museum Studies, and Native Art History programs, and will also assist IAIA in building capacity to offer graduate programs in Studio Arts, Museum Studies, and a BFA in Native American Art History. Students completing the programs will be competitively trained for careers as artists, museum administrators and curators, archivists, and professors in higher education.⁣

In addition to NM Go Bond C is Library Bond Issue B which, if approved by voters, will provide $9,500,000—which includes $3 million each for public, academic, and public school libraries, and $500,000 for tribal libraries. Academic libraries will receive much needed funding to support the success of college and university students in New Mexico by providing 24/7 access to quality resources and information.⁣

This fall, #VoteOnHigherEd!⁣

Photograph by Jason S. Ordaz, Institute of American Indian Arts
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Today is National Custodial Worker’s Recognition Day, and the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) would like to extend our gratitude to our amazing IAIA Custodial staff. These individuals work hard everyday, but this year, more than ever, they have gone above and beyond implementing extra measures in the face of a global pandemic. The work that they do to keep the IAIA campus and facilities clean is crucial, and directly promotes the safety, health, and well being of our students, faculty, and staff.⁣

Join us in thanking Mayte Estrada (PAFC, Hogan, Student Union Building), Wendy Valerlano (Residence Center, CLE), Ubaldo Trujillo (Academic Building, Science & Tech Building), Frank Wiggins (LTC, Foundry, Facilities), and Dora Estevane (Welcome Center) for their hard work and commitment to IAIA!⁣

Photograph by Jason S. Ordaz, Institute of American Indian Arts
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The Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) congratulates Academic Dean, IAIA alumna, noted artist, educator, and activist Charlene Teters (Spokane) ’86 as she embarks on the next phase of her legendary career—retirement!⁣

Teters was appointed as the Interim Dean of the Academic Division in 2000 during IAIA’s transition and move from the College of Santa Fe campus to the new campus in Rancho Viejo, and named the Academic Dean in 2015. She has exhibited internationally and maintains an active presence lecturing and delivering keynote speeches and commencement addresses across the United States. She first gained national prominence as a graduate student at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign where she led protests against the degrading depictions of Native American caricatures used as sports teams’ mascots. Teters’ activism has led to a strong upswing in efforts to eliminate Native American mascots in the United States. This history of her activism is the subject of a nationally-aired award-winning documentary “In Whose Honor?” by Jay Rosenstein. She was one of the driving forces behind the recent decision to rename the Washington Football Team.⁣

“The IAIA community will miss Dean Teters. She is a role model for us all in terms of her creative leadership in Indigenous arts education, commitment to our students, and her contributions and service to Indigenous issues through her art and activism.”—IAIA President Dr. Robert Martin (Cherokee)⁣

The Institute of American Indian Arts will hold a COVID-19 safe celebration of Dean Charlene Teters’ contributions to IAIA in the Dance Circle on campus at 3 pm (MDT). For those who are not on campus, the event will be live streamed on the IAIA Facebook page at www.facebook.com/InstituteofAmericanIndianArts.⁣

We wish you the best, Dean Teters!⁣

Photograph by Jason S. Ordaz, Institute of American Indian Arts
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The Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA) is one of twenty organizations that have been identified as “America’s Cultural Treasures.” Funded by sixteen major donors and foundations—including the FordFoundation—this initiative will grant much-needed funds to Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) arts organizations in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and aims to “honor the diversity of artistic expression and excellence in America and provide critical funding to organizations that have made a significant impact on America’s cultural landscape, despite historically limited resources.”⁣

"MoCNA is honored to receive this national recognition and award, and to be included in the twenty BIPOC organizations selected. I have had relationships with program officers of the Ford Foundation my entire career and they have always been supportive of the Indigenous art organizations I have worked with over the past 25 years, including Atlatl, Inc., the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian and the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts. Museum staff is excited to join this cohort of important BIPOC organizations and, through this support, look forward to finding new and different ways to advance contemporary Native arts and cultures.”—IAIA MoCNA Museum Director Patsy Phillips (Cherokee)⁣

IAIAMoCNA is dedicated to increasing public understanding and appreciation of contemporary Native art, history, and culture through presentation, collection and acquisition, preservation, and interpretation, and is recognized as the preeminent organizer of exhibitions devoted exclusively to the display of dynamic and diverse arts practices representative of Native North America. IAIA MoCNA is open Wednesdays through Sundays, 12–5 pm at 25% capacity.⁣

To learn more about the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, visit www.iaia.edu/mocna/, or to visit the museum in downtown Santa Fe, New Mexico, purchase a timed ticket from the IAIA store (link in bio) or in person at the MoCNA museum store.⁣

Photograph by Jason S. Ordaz, Institute of American Indian Arts
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Though it was ruled that the deadline for the #2020Census would be extended through October, why not fill it out right now and ensure that you are counted? Ten minutes now will impact the next ten years!⁣

Funding for Medicaid, Medicare, Social Security, and our local hospital are all informed by the Census. COVID-19 confirms just how important these resources are. When our people are undercounted, resources for our communities get assigned elsewhere. The Census = Power!⁣

Visit becountednow.com and take ten minutes to #BeCounted from home. iwillharness
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The Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) Office of Institutional Advancement is hiring an Advancement Services and Programs Manager and a Special Events Manager. These positions are vital to the team-based success of the Advancement Office, and support IAIA’s mission, “To empower creativity and leadership in Native Arts and cultures through higher education, life-long learning and outreach,” vision, and core values.⁣

For more information and to apply, visit www.iaia.edu/about/employment/.⁣

Photograph by Jason S. Ordaz, Institute of American Indian Arts
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The #2020Census will draw our legislative maps and decide where over a trillion dollars in federal funds will go for our hospitals, schools, roads, and more each year. We need to make sure minorities aren’t undercounted so these resources don’t go elsewhere. The Census = Power, #BeCounted. Take 10 minutes and fill out the Census at becountednow.com iwillharness ...

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One in four people aren’t registered to vote—are you? Today is #NationalVoterRegistrationDay, make sure your voice is heard in the upcoming General Election on November 3, 2020. To register, check your status, update your information, request a ballot to vote by mail, or find your polling location, visit www.vote.org or follow the link in our bio. ...

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#NMGOBondC is about the future! While not all students may be in classrooms this fall, they will return soon and need up-to-date technology and safe, comfortable learning environments. Bond C funds needed upgrades and also creates new jobs to provide an economic boost to our community. Let's invest in the future with Bond C! #VoteonHigherEd⁣

Photograph by Jason S. Ordaz, Institute of American Indian Arts
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Today the Balzer Contemporary Edge Gallery hosted a socially distanced and COVID-19 safe opening reception of the 2020 “Art Rush” Exhibition throughout the day. At the beginning of every school year, the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) holds “Art Rush,” an annual event hosted in the Balzer Contemporary Edge Gallery. The IAIA community—including students, faculty, staff, alumni, friends, and families—are invited to join in on “Art Rush” as they create works of art amongst each other with canvas, paint, brushes, and easels provided by IAIA, as well as snacks, raffles, and even a live DJ. All of the work created during the event is then curated into the annual “Art Rush” Exhibition.⁣

“Art Rush” is a free community-building event where all those who are affiliated with IAIA can come together and be creative—but this year it looked a little different. Instead of gathering closely with fellow IAIA community members in the IAIABalzerGallery to celebrate the beginning of the school year, community members were invited to take “Art Rush” home by picking up art kits and dropping off artwork as it was finished.⁣

For more information about the Balzer Contemporary Edge Gallery, visit www.iaia.edu/academics/balzer-contemporary-edge-gallery/.⁣

Photograph by Nicole Lawe, Institute of American Indian Arts
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The Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA), located in downtown Santa Fe, New Mexico, has reopened to the public at a limited capacity as per the Governor’s approval. IAIAMoCNA will be open Wednesdays through Sundays, 12–5 pm at 25% capacity (maximum 40 individuals at any given time).⁣

For more information regarding new museum protocols such as required face coverings, social distancing, and everything that has been done to ensure a safe visitor experience, visit www.iaia.edu/mocnas-reopening-plans/.⁣

Timed tickets are available for purchase online at www.iaia.edu/store (link in bio) or in-person at the MoCNA museum store.⁣

Photograph by Jason S. Ordaz, Institute of American Indian Arts
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VISIT THE COVID-19 PAGE

View the COVID-19 resource page on the IAIA website.